intj-thoughts:

lyric submission by - anonymous

original song by steam powered giraffe

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Well, I guess it was just a matter of time… but holly shit.

strugglingtobeheard:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

her name is Katherine G. Johnson

futurist-foresight:

Have we finally reached the point where Geoengineering has to be considered?

laboratoryequipment:

U.N. to Consider Geoengineering

It’s Plan B in the fight against climate change: cooling the planet by sucking heat-trapping CO2 from the air or reflecting sunlight back into space.

Called geoengineering, it’s considered mad science by opponents. Supporters say it would be foolish to ignore it, since plan A — slashing carbon emissions from fossil fuels — is moving so slowly.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/un-consider-geoengineering

ralphewig:

Supersonic - the world is still looking for a successor to the Concorde, but sonic boom and overflight noise remain the tallest hurdle. Both Lockheed Martin and Boeing are working with NASA exploring concepts which enable dramatically reduced noise levels, making a modern supersonic jetliner a possibility.

Since the Concorde’s final landing at London’s Heathrow Airport nearly a decade ago, commercial supersonic air travel has been as elusive as a piece of lost luggage. However, this hasn’t stopped NASA from continuing the quest […]

"There are three barriers particular to civil supersonic flight; sonic boom, high altitude emissions and airport noise. Of the three, boom is the most significant problem,” said Peter Coen, manager of NASA’s High Speed Project with the agency’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s Fundamental Aeronautics Program.

Previous research by NASA, the military and the aircraft industry has determined that a variety of factors, from the shape and position of aircraft components to the propulsion system’s characteristics, determine the make-up of a supersonic aircraft’s sonic boom. Therefore, engineers are able to tune or “shape” a boom signature through design to minimize the loudness of the boom it produces in flight.

theatlantic:

The Slaughter Bench of History

How war created civilization over the past 10,000 years—and threatens to destroy it in the next 40.

 Read more.[Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Campaign Finance and the Nihilist Politics of Resignation

Most Americans want to take money out of government but don’t think it’s possible. Here’s a plan for overcoming our defeatism.

Read more. [Image: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters]

nbcnews:

Moon-day! Set your clock for the lunar eclipse

(Photo: Akira Fujii / Sky & Telescope file)

Monday night’s marvels are worth staying up late for: Not only will Mars be bigger and brighter than it’s been for more than six years, but you’ll also be able to see the first total lunar eclipse in more than two years.

Continue reading

SHIT - Clouds in the forecast…


theatlantic:

In Focus: The Cyprus Buffer Zone, Frozen in Time

This year marks four decades since the Cyprus National Guard staged a coup that led to Turkish military intervention and escalated the civil war between the Greek and Turkish communities on the island. After the ceasefire, a heavily restricted buffer zone, controlled by the United Nations, was established between the north and south. It stretches 180 km (112 mi) across the whole island measuring 7.4 km (4.6 mi) at its widest and 3.3 m (11 ft) at its narrowest point. The demilitarized zone is restricted to the general public and no Greek or Turkish Cypriots are allowed inside. Reuters photographer Neil Hall recently visited the buffer zone, which still contains crumbling relics of times gone by - abandoned houses, businesses, and even an airport - crumbling snapshots of Cyprus in 1974.

Read more.


prostheticknowledge:

OculusDrone

Hacking experiment from Diego Araos in controlling a camera-mounted ParrotAR drone with an Oculus Rift and head tracking - video embedded below:

Integrated Oculus Rift head tracking and video feed with the AR Drone to make a head motion controller. It’s really fun and latency very low.

This project is open source and a fork of another of my projects drone-swarm (to control several AR Drones within one network)

Source code can be found at GitHub here


futurist-foresight:

I look at the US Navy`s railgun in action - sea trials to start in 2020 2016.

2020:

[The U.S. Navy’s] latest weapon is an electromagnetic railgun launcher. It uses a form of electromagnetic energy known as the Lorentz force to hurl a 23-pound projectile at speeds exceeding Mach 7. Engineers already have tested this futuristic weapon on land, and the Navy plans to begin sea trials aboard a Joint High Speed Vessel Millinocket in 2016.

http://www.wired.com/2014/04/electromagnetic-railgun-launcher/

(Source: youtube.com)